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Dr.Christopher Pullen
Orthopaedic Surgeon

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Shoulders

Shoulder Arthroscopy :: Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression :: Rotator Cuff Repair
Shoulder Joint Replacement :: Shoulder Anatomy :: Frozen Shoulder :: Shoulder Impingement
Shoulder Instability :: Open Anterior Stabilisation :: SLAP Repair

Shoulder Arthroscopy

A shoulder arthroscopy involves looking inside the joint with a thin camera (arthroscope). The arthroscope is placed inside the joint through a small incision and the picture is shown on a TV screen. Fluid is gently pumped into the joint to fill the space to make it easier to see. Tools are passed into the joint through 2 or 3 more small cuts and watched using the arthroscope and TV screen.

Find out more about Shoulder Arthroscopy with the following links.

Shoulder Arthroscopy Shoulder Arthroscopy

Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression

Rehabilitation Following Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression

Phase 1: Immediate postoperative period (weeks 0-1)

Exercises:

  1. Finger, wrist, and elbow AROM (3x/day minimum).
  2. Pendular exercises (3x/day minimum).
  3. Ice for pain and inflammation.
  4. May do general conditioning program, i.e. walking, stationary bicycle, etc.
  5. Sling worn for comfort only.

Find out more about Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression with the following links.

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Rotator Cuff Repair

Rehabilitation Following Rotator Cuff Repair
(Modified from Rehabilitation of the Rotator Cuff: J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2006)

Phase 1: Immediate postoperative period (weeks 0-6)

Avoid:

  1. Shoulder AROM.
  2. Lifting objects.
  3. Shoulder motion behind back.
  4. Excessive stretching or sudden movements.
  5. Supporting any weight including body weight.

Find out more about Rotator Cuff Repair with the following links.

Rotator Cuff Repair Rotator Cuff Repair

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Rehabilitation Following Shoulder Joint Replacement

Phase 1: Immediate postoperative period (weeks 0-4)

Keep incision clean and dry for first two weeks.

Goals:

  1. Allow soft tissue healing (protect subscapularis repair).
  2. Maintain prosthesis integrity.

Find out more about Shoulder Joint Replacement with the following links.

Shoulder Joint Replacement Shoulder Joint Replacement

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder joint. It affects about two percent of people and is more common in women aged 40 to 70 years old. People with diabetes are at higher risk. Frozen shoulder can occur after an injury, especially if a sling is used for some time.

Frozen Shoulder Frozen Shoulder

SLAP Repair

Rehabilitation Following SLAP Repair

Phase 1: Immediate postoperative period (weeks 0-4)

Keep incision clean and dry for first two weeks.

Goals:

  1. Protect repair.
  2. Minimise stiffness.

Avoid:

  1. Resisted biceps (no active elbow flexion, no biceps strengthening).
  2. Lifting objects.

Find out more about SLAP Repair with the following links.

SLAP Repair

Open Anterior Stabilisation

Rehabilitation Following Open Anterior Stabilisation (Bankart Repair)

Phase 1: Immediate postoperative period (weeks 0-4)

Keep incision clean and dry for first two weeks.

Goals:

  1. Protect repair (subscapularis tendon).
  2. Minimise stiffness.

Avoid:

  • Lifting objects

Find out more about Open Anterior Stabilisation with the following links.

Open Anterior Stabilisation

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability represents a spectrum of disorders, the successful management of which requires a correct diagnosis and treatment. The boundaries of this spectrum are represented by a subluxation event (a partial dislocation which spontaneously reduces), to a complete dislocation that often requires anesthesia to reduce the shoulder. The majority of instabilities are traumatic in nature and the ball of the shoulder is unstable toward the front of the shoulder. It is this type of shoulder instability that we will concentrate on here

Shoulder Instability Shoulder Instability

Streaming Videos


Interactive web based movies (click on the desired topic to find out more)

Shoulder Anatomy
Shoulder Impingement

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Dr.Christopher Pullen Orthopaedic Surgeon Shoulder Elbow Trauma Blackburn South VIC
About Dr. Christopher Pullen